Test & PrEP

The goal of HIV counseling and testing is to assist individuals in assessing their risk and understanding their test results and to help them develop a personalized prevention plan. Counseling includes notifying the patient of the availability of partner counseling and referral services, the benefits of such services, and the confidentiality protections available as part of such services. HIV-infected persons and those at risk for HIV are referred to needed services, including substance abuse treatment, Healthy Start, prevention case management, and medical care.

For more information on HIV testing basics please click here.

The "Take Control" initiative provides FREE Rapid HIV Testing in non-clinical settings. The goal is to encourage individuals to know their HIV status and seek treatment and care, if needed.

Our Test Miami Mobile Unit serves the Miami-Dade County community by providing free preventative education and testing such as HIV testing and Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, & Syphilis Screenings. For a list of upcoming events where we will be providing FREE HIV & STD testing please see our Events Calendar.

PrEP / PEP

PrEP (Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis) is a comprehensive HIV prevention strategy that involves the daily use of antiretroviral medications to reduce the risk of HIV infection in HIV-negative individuals. In July 2012, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of Truvada (TDF/FTC) for use as PrEP in HIV prevention in sexually active HIV-negative individuals. PrEP is used in conjunction with other prevention methods to reduce the risk of infection.

Post Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) involves taking antiretroviral medications as soon as possible after a potential exposure to HIV to reduce the likelihood of HIV infection. There are two types of PEP: 1) occupational PEP, or an exposure that happens in the workplace (such as a needle stick in a healthcare setting), and 2) non-occupational PEP (nPEP), or when someone is potentially exposed to HIV through sexual intercourse or injection drug use.

To be effective, PEP must begin with 72 hours of exposure and consists of 2-3 antiretroviral medications that must be taken for 28 days. A physician must determine what treatment is appropriate based on the nature of the exposure. Starting PEP after a potential exposure does not guarantee that someone exposed to HIV will not become infected.

To find a PrEP provider near you, please visit the PrEP Locator.

For more information on PrEP / PEP please visit, https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html.
To learn more about PrEP (video format) please visit, http://www.whatisprep.org/.